Growing Through the Darkness

Sometimes God allows times of transition to create transformation.”  – Lynn Cowell

 

I can promise you that I do not have an affinity with darkness.  I actually consider myself to be a very optimistic person, who consistently attempts to look on the brighter side of life, however after blogging for approximately two years now, I have come to better understand the many hurting people who still exist in the world.  An even more closer, the ones that have the courage to share a little of their personal stories on social media with me and the audience I share here on this website. 

As I have mentioned in prior posts, life is hard and we can never fully be ready for all that comes with our specific journeys, and I have had the privilege to hear some amazing stories of tragedy, recovery and being somewhere in the middle of both.  What remains consistent with each story is the insurmountable feeling of loss, grief, pain and turmoil each person experiences as they go through their season of darkness, yet there has equally been a consistent ray of hope that seems to keep them holding on and seeking to get beyond it.  

I am truly blessed to be a part of such a wonderful community of people who “get it”, and I wanted to take the time in this post to acknowledge those that continue to suffer and press through darkness.  Suffering has no ethnicity, gender or religious background.  It comes to us all, planned and by surprise, day or night, young and old.  It does not take in consideration how nice we are or who we may have hurt in the past.  It just comes, and often like a rushing wind.  

So if you find yourself smack in the middle of a hard place, this post is for you.  A few things you should know was you go through:

 

1. You are not alone, even if you feel like you are. – One of the worst things you can do while facing a tragedy is to go it alone.  This is not to say that everyone in your circle should know your intimate secrets, but isolation is the devils playground and when you retreat from your immediate world you lose some of your best resources for good counsel and support.  Darkness is just that, a place where we cannot always see our way due to the circumstances we face and the emotions we harbor.  So as you are feeling your way through that dark place, do not be afraid to reach out to someone who may know better than you do, been there before and willing to offer support.  It can literally change the trajectory of where you are headed. 

 

2. Give yourself license to feel the pain of your situation. –  So often we are told to get over it and move on, and we equally know that is much easier vocalized than done.  We are each different, with our own set of propensities to recover, see the light and move past our pain.  Some bodies heal faster than others and I imagine this logically applies to the emotional part of us as well, so don’t get in a hurry seeking relief, because in that search what you may find will only offer a temporary refuge, not a sustaining peace that you need.  Although pain never feels good, it does have a way of stripping us of pride and deflecting blame on others after it has run its course.  Once you begin to allow ourselves to feel the pain that you are experiencing it will force you to reconcile more of the core issues that caused it.  It is definitely not our initial response while going through the difficulty, but if we can gather the courage to have those hard conversations with ourselves the sooner we begin to address the hard stuff. 

 

3. Don’t beat yourself up over what happened or hold yourself hostage with anger. –  Whether it was your fault or not, there has to be a time that you begin to move past that specific place of blame.  Once you accepted responsibility, or had the opportunity to speak with the person who offended you, (and said your peace) it is time to move on.  Harboring feelings of resentment can only lead to more pain and the short cycling of your own healing and recovery.  This becomes critical as you see yourself getting better, but you allow someone or some circumstance to take you backwards.  It is important to realize that you cannot undo the past.  What is done is done, but the unrealized future still remains ahead of you, and how you choose to respond to it will dictate if you will be ready for it or not, and even influence how it will manifest later your life. 

 

4. Know who your safe friends are (including family). –  One of the fastest ways to relapse back to a place of bitterness and unresolved pain is to surround yourself around people who do not support the process of your recovery.  Sometimes our friends can become more angry than we were at times.  I am all for my “ride or die” folks that want to come to my aid, but it is equally important for them to know when to stand down and accept where I am, whether they agree with me or not.  Remember, it is always easier for someone else to remove themselves from your circumstance when they have no real attachment, authentic connection or ultimate responsibility to it, therefore remain with like-minded people.  Ones that want to see you grow and become healthier versus being full of unforgiveness and aiming to seek revenge. 

 

5. Take life one day at a time. –  I truly empathize with those of you who are going through hard times.  It is never easy and often feels like the pain will never go away.  I know from my own personal experiences, but it does get easier as we learn the lessons we are supposed to learn and grow from the situation.  This is a process that cannot be rushed.  It takes time and what we choose to do in that time really counts.  My best advice is to take everything one day at a time.  It may sound like a trivial piece of advice, but it is really important to get this.  Now is not the time to be in a hurry and speed your life away, but purposefully slow it down through surrendering prayer, meaningful mediation and thought-provoking reflection. 

 

Growing through darkness can be a reality that we all experience when life gets hard.  It certainly will not come easy and unfortunately many decide to prematurely quit before recognizing the change they desire, but it is possible.  I am a living witness.  After suffering two divorces, being molested and experiencing other broken relationships, I have had my share of pain that I wish on no human being, but through it all I have grown and learned some lessons that I will carry with me for the remainder of my life.  Lessons that cause me to stand when I feel like falling, see hope when life seems hopeless and acknowledge that life could always be worse when it seems at it hardest point.  I have grown through my darkest seasons and so can you.  Never give up!

 

Keep Pressing,

Hank G

 

Author: Hank

Twice-divorced, single father of 3. I love to write, share ideas and listen to people. I'm transparent to a fault and love to learn through authentic and intimate conversation. I'm no stranger to pain and loss, but through the struggle I have learned a great deal about me and what's truly important. That is to love fearlessly and to be loved in return in a meaningful way. I love good music and how it takes me to a place... Life is good.

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