Taking Off Your Armor

”You will never be able to escape your heart.  So it’s better to listen to what it has to say.” – Paul Coelho

 

Just last week I witnessed a dad telling his 4-5 year old son to not be a “cry baby” because he wanted his mother.  It was in a public place, so I am pretty sure the father was a bit embarrassed, not because he should have been, but because of the valueless stereotype placed on boys, (and fathers) whom one day become men that are taught to believe that emotions, specifically crying is a sign of weakness and should never be displayed. 

The term is, “suck it up”, and as a dad I have used it with my own son on many occasions, and have been told the same by my father many times growing up.  Initially it seems like a harmless thing, but over time young boys (like me) learned to internalize that idea, and it eventually began to shape how we think about what it meant to be a man, father and husband. 

Imagine growing up and being shamed for displaying any type of emotions.  Being called a cry baby, punk or sissy. After a while you learn to contain those emotions, just to protect yourself from being shamed any longer, despite the circumstances and the slow burning turmoil begins. 

Now I absolutely celebrate the beauty of our differences as men and women.  We each play an important role in the family and in some cases the roles are actually reversed, but nonetheless there are a unique set of attributes being disseminated to our offspring through us.   Those attributes do not primarily come from what we say, but ultimately how we live and interact with our children. 

What is important to take note of is one day we grow up.  We become men who raise our own children, men who establish relationships, get married, interact in the work place and in our respective communities.  What does this type of man give if he has been told all his life that his authentic self is weak and should be replaced by someone better, someone stronger or someone less sensitive?

He morphs into that acceptable image of a man and screams inside,  because we learn it feels better to be accepted for who we are not, than to be ridiculed for who we really are. 

Obviously this goes deeper than just being shamed for crying after experiencing a fall, cut or bruise.  It is about the impact to our psyche, ideals about who we are and possibly who we will become in the future.  If I choose to hide my best self, due to the shame I experienced for a great part of my life what have I become?  Sadly I have become a liar of the worst kind.  The one that lies to himself. 

It took me many years to truly discover who I was.  I was ashamed based on what I thought I was supposed to be true about me, but I eventually learned there was more to who I was, and those new discoveries were admirable, holistic, pure and honest.   I learned that I was okay in my own skin, no matter what anyone else had to say. 

So much of our lives is spent on jockeying for position, affirmation and status.  We our taught at those tender young impressionable ages through expression, interactions and experiences, that we really are not good enough as we are.  Therefore we spend a lifetime reinventing ourselves.  For men, we define ourselves by our possessions, how strong and viral we are and the current status we hold in the workplace and community. 

Of course the aforementioned list has it’s place and relevance in our lives, but far too often it becomes the standard we live by name strive for.  Therefore we short-circuit the creative genius and beauty that is waiting to manifest itself. 

Sadly, for so many that beauty and creative genius will die or remain dormant, trapped inside the walls of shame, disgrace and fear that someone else built for us many years prior.  Like a glass ceiling we can see the other side, we just are not sure how to actually get to the other side of it.  So we make do with what we know and are comfortable with, however something on the inside will always be shouting to us,  “YOU ARE MORE THAN YOU ARE RIGHT NOW!” 

Will you listen or simply continue living with the armor on? 

 

Keep Pressing,

Hank G

 

 

Author: Hank

Twice-divorced, single father of 3. I love to write, share ideas and listen to people. I'm transparent to a fault and love to learn through authentic and intimate conversation. I'm no stranger to pain and loss, but through the struggle I have learned a great deal about me and what's truly important. That is to love fearlessly and to be loved in return in a meaningful way. I love good music and how it takes me to a place... Life is good.

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