Why Am I Afraid to Tell You Who I Am?

 

No one can develop freely in this world and find a full life without feeling understood by at least one person” Dr. Paul Tournier, M.D.

 

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The moment I began this blog I knew a level of my privacy would be gone forever.  For many reasons I was just fine with this.  I’m not sure if it was the many years of teaching classes and sharing bits and pieces of my life to strangers and friends for years, or going through a few bad relationships that broke me.  Maybe its how I am framed.  Whatever the reason, here I am sharing my life story to the world with no hesitancy.  Some of my friends ask me, “how do you feel after releasing such a personal part of you to everyone?”  My answer is simple.  I’ve released everything I have written long before I press the send button.  It would be too painful to do it any other way.  My point is, the journey that I took to get here was hard, agonizing, however essential, like a prerequisite or pre-qualification to share with you on this type of platform.  I have nothing to lose by sharing my story to the world.  I actually have a sense of peace knowing that my traumatic life experiences, when shared with integrity will impact someone to hope more, hold on a little while longer or keep believing that life is worth living.

It wasn’t always this way.  Like many, I had secret parts of me that no one knew about.  I was a master at disguising the real me.  What I divulged was perfectly orchestrated.  No surprises, at least to me.  I was in control and very comfortable with it.  The sad part about all of this was, I was living a lie (at least to a degree).  The real me was hidden and only surfaced when I allowed him to.  A “Plan B” was ALWAYS in my line of sight.  I would not be hurt, (so I thought) rejected or dismissed by anyone.  I knew how to protect myself, like drinking a disinfectant.  It’s meant to kill germs, but when applied incorrectly it can destroy everything it touches.  This was me.  Hurting everyone around me, by keeping the ones I professed to love at a distance.  I wouldn’t dare reveal the real me. 

Once the brokenness (read my other post to find out what they are) did its work in me and I chose to surrender, my life begin to change.  This change didn’t simply occur because I willed it to, but because I was in a new place.  A place of reflection, a place of being still and finally coming to the understanding that I was missing something very essential to living a full life.  That place was being true to myself.  I mean really true.  I came across a great book entitled, “Why Am I Afraid to Tell You Who I Am?”, by John Powell. 

It challenged me to look into the mirror of my soul and ask myself several hard questions, like:

 

 

  1. What is at the core of my fear to show my real self?
  2. What happens when I finally disclose who I am?
  3. Why did I always seem to have a “Plan B” in place?

 

Answer to Question 1 – Ultimately I have learned to understand that my biggest fear was the fear of rejection.  I honestly had a fear that if the most important people in my life truly knew me, there is no way that they would still accept me, therefore that perpetuated the lie.  It’s human nature for most of us to believe that we’ll never be good enough or measure up to societies’ standards and the truth is we may not ever measure up, but what we must learn is we are enough as we are.  My faith in God tells me that I am ever-growing, imperfect and to trust the process of my transformation to evolve to the best me over time.  It cannot be with a mindset of comparing myself to others or pretending I understand something when I truly do not.  We all want to be accepted by others, but we must resist the temptation to project something or someone who we have not yet become.  If we only fit into a specific circle because of an illusion that we feel obligated to project, than we continue to lie to ourselves and perpetuate a lifestyle that saps us of all the creative energy essential to living a life of authentic wholeness.

To authentically learn to love thyself is to release the bondage of performing for others in order to be loved and accepted. 

When we learn what mask we place on our hearts every time we have an opportunity to be fully present, is the moment that our chains will begin to drop off.  For those of us that have perfected this to an art form, it may require much more work, prayer and therapy to have full release, but it is certainly possible.  I am a living witness.  

 

Answer to Question 2 – It’s easy to think that our world will fall a part when we finally choose to live a life of integrity when we haven’t for so long.  When we’re making decisions to bring the real me to the table for the very first time, our common sense may tell us to consider the cost and take delicate steps.  As a man who can over think even the simplest of things, I encourage you to listen to your first mind and take that leap of faith and courage.  No need to figure it out completely, write a dissertation on it or share it with ten friends, just step out and frickin do it.  

Take baby steps at first.  

I remember the first person that I confessed to that I was molested and the first person that knew how broken I really felt after my string of broken relationships.  It was absolutely freeing!  For us men, we don’t do this.  We place a cork on every hurt and disappointment that we have ever experienced, and will profess that it doesn’t matter when we know that it really does.  We’ll cope by turning to drugs, illicit affairs, meaningless sex, violence and others acts that are detrimental to ourselves and others.  While these coping mechanisms may provide a temporary way of escape, they are also equally effective in keeping a barrier up so we can remain elusive, at bay and removed from the painful reality we’re trying so desperately hard to escape.  Sad truth is it doesn’t work.  It never works.  Disclosing who I really am brings on freedom like nothing else can.  It’s the truth we have heard of for so long that truly sets us free.

 

Answer to Question 3 – I’ve learned over the years that having a “Plan B” in place is quite common in most things we do.  We’ve been taught as children that with college and career choices, we needed a “Plan B”.  We always need to have something to fall back on just in case our first plan didn’t come through.  This practice has carried over to serious relationships, even marriage.  I recently saw an article on Facebook where a poll was taken on how many women had a backup “friend” in case their marriages didn’t work out.  

A staggering 80% of the women polled, admitted to having someone there if their relationships were ever in trouble.

I imagine this is not just a women’s issue, but more a human issue.  We will enter into relationships declaring our whole heart to someone, (I know this because I did it) committing our lives, time and future, essentially all that we are safe to share and know good and well we aren’t ready yet.  We know that we have only revealed the best parts of us, even after a few years and we dare to take the relationship to the next level.  What pain this will bring you! Ultimately, none of us want to be frauds or live a lie, but many of the pains of our lives have made it very comfortable for us to retreat to the person that seems most accepted in that particular moment.  No one quite knows but us when we shift into that other guy or gal mode.  

We smile and laugh the same, we still share in interesting exchanges and come across as very engaged, but something deep within us has checked out.  

The familiar wall begins to rise and soon we’re projecting a limited version of who we are.  “Plan B” is full effect at this time.  For me it simply was easier to project this guy then to be explicitly open with the ones closest to me.  My “Plan B” was my safety net and I had justified why I allowed it to exist, not realizing that it was suffocating those important relationships and my own personal growth.

Thankfully, as we continue to journey through life we find ourselves with opportunities to grow.  These are typically the times when we have suffered a broken heart or some other type of tragedy.  When we confess that we hurt, or that someone hurt us we can begin to own that pain and do something positive with it.  

The pain is just the indicator, like a warning light on the dashboard of your car.

It’s our opportunity to heal by acknowledging the pain.  It’s our opportunity to remove the walls that have effectively kept us watching life, versus doing life.  Being afraid to tell someone who you really are is indeed a scary thing, but I have learned its scarier to live a life alone, a life alone with people all around you that are clueless to the real you.  It’s time to step off the ledge my friends.  Dare to believe that you can.

Keep Pressing,

Hank G

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Hank

Twice-divorced, single father of 3. I love to write, share ideas and listen to people. I'm transparent to a fault and love to learn through authentic and intimate conversation. I'm no stranger to pain and loss, but through the struggle I have learned a great deal about me and what's truly important. That is to love fearlessly and to be loved in return in a meaningful way. I love good music and how it takes me to a place... Life is good.

  • Sarurah

    A topic I’ve been contemplating a lot! Your point about “Plan B” … very interesting. I never thought of it that way- how we create Plan B’s constantly. A “safety net” can be a tether that will keep us from flying. Great post Hank!

    • Hi Sarurah, thank you for the comments. Eliminating the Plan B definitely willl lead to us becoming vulnerable, but this is truly what leads to our freedom.

  • UNIQQ M

    Great post!!
    Truthful! Awakening! Encouraging! Inspiring!

    It’s refreshing to read raw truths that some of us may have experienced or are presently experiencing. Very liberating to know we are not alone and that there’s a new chapter of “sunshine” awaiting. Thank you, Hank, for providing food for thought to help encourage positive change.

    Change is not always easy (can be painful) yet…..change is necessary to live our best life possible.

    Hank, I really liked reading this post!! You’re posts continue to help us all “Keep pressing…..”

    Thank you!!

    Note: Plan “B” section of your post, very interesting read. Also, I continue to like how you end your weekly posts, with encouraging advice which can help enhance positive change. Thank you.

    • Hi UNIQQ M, as always, thank you for your thoughtful comments. Change is certainly not easy, but sometimes the best thing for us.

      I appreciate your support!

  • Steve Smith

    Thank you for this. I’m a man newly stepping into truth and trust and a foundation of self love. It’s scary as hell – and, it feels promising. This post helps me know I’m not the only one, and I’m grateful for that.

    • Hello Steve, I truly appreciate your reply. It definitely is not an easy step for us men. We’re just raised to do things differently, but after all the struggle, I believe my journey towards discovering me was worth every effort. You are certainly not alone and I’m glad this post helps. Keep pressing and I hope to see you visit again.

      Thanks, Hank

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